The 28th of December gets no respect. It’s just another day in the week most people take off to go to the beach.

But 100 years ago people sat up and noticed. Specifically, they noticed an article in the New York Evening Mail.

The Rise of the Bathtub
The first bathtub in the United States was installed in Cincinnati December 20, 1842, by Adam Thompson. It was made of mahogany and lined with sheet lead. At a Christmas party he exhibited and explained it and four guests later took a plunge. The next day the Cincinnati paper devoted many columns to the new invention and it gave rise to violent controversy.

Some papers designated it as an epicurian luxury, other called it undemocratic, as it lacked simplicity in its surroundings. Medical authorities attacked it as dangerous to health.

The controversy reached other cities, and in more than one place medical opposition was reflected in legislation. In 1843 the Philadelphia Common Council considered an ordinance prohibiting bathing between November 1 and March 15, and this ordinance failed of passage by but two votes.

During the same year the Legislature of Virginia laid a tax of $30 a year on all bathtubs that might be set up. In Hartford, Providence, Charleston and Wilmington special and very heavy water rates were laid on persons who had bathtubs. Boston in 1845 made bathing unlawful except on medical advice, but the ordinance was never enforced and in 1862 it was repealed.

President Millard Fillmore gave the bathtub recognition and respectability. While Vice President he visited Cincinnati in 1850 on a stumping tour and inspected the original bathtub and used it. Experiencing no ill effects he became an ardent advocate, and on becoming President he had a tub installed in the White House. The Secretary of War invited bids for the installation. This tub continued to be the one in use until the first Cleveland Administration.

And it’s been bouncing around the world and the internet since.

 

 

 





29
Nov
'17

Via Neatorama





30
Mar
'17



(no, not bodies)

20170204

P1140155r

Turns out we could have used a minivan full of Mexicans.

 

 

 

 





25
Jan
'17

If you like Brandi Carlile’s The Story but you think the song is just a little bit too big for her, try Minniva Børresen.

 





In 1948 the Chicago Tribune was so confident of election results that they printed the newspaper the night before and went to bed early.

DeweyDefeatsTruman

Hey, maybe I‘m jumping the gun here, but the New York Times has Trump at >95% right now and that can’t be easy for them of all people.

 





:-)
11
Sep
'16

14333125_1818223351742836_55728044014253394_n





31
Aug
'16

C1166

This is a C1166 Pulse Tetrode made by English Electric, who also made transistors. Good for switching 17 500 volts at 15 amps. But only for 1 microsecond every 1 millisecond (1T4 and AA battery for scale).

The filament alone needs almost 60 watts (9 amps at 6.3 volts).

Quite useless unless one wants to build a glowbug radar or something. But quite marvelous in a way.





Back in 1935, Charles Garrett built a carburetor that allowed a standard car engine to run on water.

The patents were immediately bought by the fuel companies and put on the shelf next to the Pogue carburetor and the Oglemobile.

I wonder what they’re going to do about these fellows making fuel from water using solar power?





20
Jul
'16

*ring* *ring*

“Hello, Crazy Mo’s pizza place, how may we help you?”

“Well we’d like *yadda* *yadda* *yadda* *yadda* and a mac & cheese”

“Would you like the mac & cheese with penne or tagliatelle?”

*blink*   *blink*





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